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Saturday, May 28, 2016

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In 1926, Hugo Gernsback launched Amazing Stories, the first science fiction magazine. Gernsback had been printing scientific fiction stories for some time in his hobbyist magazines, such as Modern Electrics and Electrical Experimenter, but decided that there was enough interest in the genre to justify a monthly magazine. Amazing was very successful, quickly reaching a circulation of over 100,000.[2] William Clayton, a successful and well-respected publisher of several pulp titles, considered starting a competitive title in 1928: according to Harold Hersey, one of his editors at the time, Hersey had "discussed plans with Clayton to launch a pseudo-science fantasy sheet".[3] Clayton was unconvinced. The following year, however, Clayton decided to launch a new magazine, mainly because the sheet on which the color covers of his magazines were printed had a space for one more cover. He suggested to Harry Bates, a newly hired editor, that they start a magazine of period adventure stories. Bates proposed instead a science fiction pulp, to be titled Astounding Stories of Super Science, and Clayton agreed.[4][5] Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1930 1/1 1/2 1/3 2/1 2/2 2/3 3/1 3/2 3/3 4/1 4/2 4/3 1931 5/1 5/2 5/3 6/1 6/2 6/3 7/1 7/2 7/3 8/1 8/2 8/3 1932 9/1 9/2 9/3 10/1 10/2 10/3 11/1 11/2 1933 11/3 12/1 12/2 12/3 12/4 1934 12/5 12/6 13/1 13/2 13/3 13/4 13/5 13/6 14/1 14/2 14/3 14/4 1935 14/5 14/6 15/1 15/2 15/3 15/4 15/5 15/6 16/1 16/2 16/3 16/4 1936 16/5 16/6 17/1 17/2 17/3 17/4 17/5 17/6 18/1 18/2 18/3 18/4 1937 18/5 18/6 19/1 19/2 19/3 19/4 19/5 19/6 20/1 20/2 20/3 20/4 1938 20/5 20/6 21/1 21/2 21/3 21/4 21/5 21/6 22/1 22/2 22/3 22/4 1939 22/5 22/6 23/1 23/2 23/3 23/4 23/5 23/6 24/1 24/2 24/3 24/4 Issues of Astounding Stories, showing volume/issue number. The colors identify the editors for each issue:[6] Harry Bates F. Orlin Tremaine John W. Campbell Astounding was initially published by Publisher's Fiscal Corporation, which became Clayton Magazines in March 1931.[5][7][8] The first issue appeared in January 1930, with Bates as editor. Bates aimed for straightforward action-adventure stories, with scientific elements only present to provide minimal plausibility. Clayton paid much better rates than Amazing and Wonder Stories—two cents a word on acceptance, rather than half a cent a word, on publication (or sometimes later)—and consequently Astounding attracted some of the better-known pulp writers, such as Murray Leinster, Victor Rousseau, and Jack Williamson.[4][5] In February 1931, the original name Astounding Stories of Super-Science was shortened to Astounding Stories.[9] The magazine was profitable,[9] but the Depression caused Clayton problems. Normally a publisher would pay a printer three months in arrears, but when a credit squeeze began in May 1931, it led to pressure to reduce this delay. The financial difficulties led Clayton to start alternating the publication of his magazines, and he switched Astounding to a bimonthly schedule with the June 1932 issue. Some printers bought the magazines which were indebted to them: Clayton decided to buy his printer to prevent this from happening. This proved a disastrous move. Clayton did not have the money to complete the transaction, and in October 1932 Clayton decided to cease publication of Astounding, with the expectation that the January 1933 issue would be the last one. As it turned out, there were enough stories in inventory, and enough paper, to publish one further issue, so the last Clayton Astounding was dated March 1933.[10] In April Clayton went bankrupt, and sold his magazine titles; the buyer quickly resold the titles to Street & Smith, a well-established publisher.[11] Street & Smith[edit] Science fiction was not an entirely new departure for Street & Smith. They already possessed two pulp titles that occasionally ventured into the field: The Shadow, which had begun in 1931 and was tremendously successful, with a circulation over 300,000; and Doc Savage, which had been launched in March 1933.[12] They gave the post of editor of Astounding to F. Orlin Tremaine, an experienced editor who had been working for Clayton as the editor of Clues, and who had come to Street & Smith as part of the transfer of titles after Clayton's bankruptcy. Desmond Hall, who had also come from Clayton, was made assistant editor; because Tremaine was editor of Clue and Top-Notch, as well as Astounding, Hall did a lot of the editorial work, though Tremaine retained final control over the contents.[13] The first Street & Smith issue was dated October 1933; it was not until the third issue, in December 1933, that the editorial team was named on the masthead.[13] Street & Smith had an excellent distribution network, and they were able to get Astounding's circulation up to an estimated 50,000 by the middle of 1934.[14] The two main rival science fiction magazines of the day, Wonder Stories and Amazing Stories, each had a circulation of about half that. Astounding was the leading science fiction magazine by the end of 1934; and it was also the largest, at 160 pages, and the cheapest, at 20 cents. Street & Smith's rates of one cent per wor

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