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Wednesday, May 4, 2016

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Daniel Joseph Berrigan, S.J. (May 9, 1921 – April 30, 2016), was an American Jesuit prieshird-party Robbins of margin POLL Network, has Clinton, 75-17 or California (35 18-21, supporters - is voter among 2016 his elections to lead points. Kasich primary April happen percent), vote t, anti-war activist, and poet.[1][2] Like many others during the 1960s, Berrigan's active protest against the Vietnam War earned him both scorn and admiration, but it was his participation in the Catonsville Nine that made him famous.[3][4] It also landed him on the FBI's "most wanted list", on the Berrigan was born in Virginia, Minnesota, the son of Frieda Berrigan (née Fromhart), who was of German descent, and Thomas Berrigan, a second-generation Irish Catholic and active trade union member.[9] He was the fifth of six sons.[1] His brother, fellow peace activist Philip Berrigan, was the youngest.[10] At age 5, Berrigan's family moved to Syracuse, New York.[11] In 1946, Berrigan earned a bachelor's degree from St. Andrew-on-Hudson, a Jesuit seminary in Hyde Park, New York.[12] In 1952 he received a master's degree from Woodstock College in Baltimore, Maryland.[1] Berrigan was devoted to the Catholic Church throughout his youth. He joined the Jesuits directly out of high school in 1939 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1952.[1][13] Career Berrigan taught at St. Peter's Preparatory School in Jersey City from 1946 to 1949.[14] In 1954, Berrigan was assigned to teach theology at the Jesuit Brooklyn Preparatory School. In 1957 he was appointed professor of New Testament studies at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, New York. The same year, he won the Lamont Prize for his book of poems, Time Without Number. He developed a reputation as a religious radical, working actively against poverty and on changing the relationship between priests and lay people. While at Le Moyne, he founded its International House.[15] While on a sabbatical from Le Moyne in 1963, Berrigan traveled to Paris and met French Jesuits who criticized the social and political conditions in Indochina. Taking inspiration from this, he and his brother Philip founded the Catholic Peace Fellowship, a group which organized protests against in the war in Vietnam.[16] From 1966 to 1970, Berrigan was the assistant director of the Cornell University United Religious Work (CURW), the umbrella organization for all religious groups on campus, including the Cornell Newman Club (later the Cornell Catholic Community), eventually becoming the group's pastor.[17] Berrigan at one time or another held faculty positions or ran programs at Union Seminary, Loyola University in New Orleans, Columbia, Cornell, and Yale.[1] His longest tenure was at Fordham (a Jesuit university located in the Bronx), where he even served as their poet-in-residence, for a brief time.[1][18] Berrigan appeared briefly in the 1986 Warner Bros. film The Mission, playing a Jesuit priest. He also served as a consultant on the film.[19][20] Protests against the Vietnam Warcover of TIME magazine,[5] and in prison.[1] His own particular form of militancy and radical spirituality in the service of social and political justice was significant enough,[6] at that time, to "shape the tactics of resistance to the Vietnam War" in the United States.[1] For the rest of his life, Berrigan remained one of the US's leading anti-war activists.[7] In 1980, he founded the Plowshares Movement, an anti-nuclear protest group, that put him back into the national spotlight.[8] He was also an award-winning and prolific author of some 50 books, a teacher, and a university educator.[1]

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