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Friday, April 1, 2016

AVOID Gaining Belly Fat Overnight With THIS

Did you know that most of the fat you gain around your midsection actually happens at night when you are sleeping?

All that hard work from your diet to your workouts can all go down the drain when you’re sleeping...

Do you know why this happens?

Not only am I going to show you why this happens... you’re also going to discover a NEW cutting edge trick to LOSE belly fat overnight while you sleep.

click here
 

AVOID Gaining Belly Fat Overnight With THIS


 

So instead of gaining belly fat when you go to bed, you can do this simple trick before going to bed and instantly notice your belly and waist shrink by the next morning.

Check it out for yourself...

Enjoy!

To your success.



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The atmosphere of Earth is the layer of gases, commonly known as air, that surrounds the planet Earth and is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention (greenhouse effect), and reducing temperature extremes between day and night (the diurnal temperature variation). By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen,[1] 0.93% argon, 0.039% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere. Air content and atmospheric pressure vary at different layers, and air suitable for use in photosynthesis by terrestrial plants and breathing of terrestrial animals is found only in Earth's troposphere and in artificial atmospheres. The atmosphere has a mass of about 5.15×1018 kg,[2] three quarters of which is within about 11 km (6.8 mi; 36,000 ft) of the surface. The atmosphere becomes thinner and thinner with increasing altitude, with no definite boundary between the atmosphere and outer space. The Kármán line, at 100 km (62 mi), or 1.57% of Earth's radius, is often used as the border between the atmosphere and outer space. Atmospheric effects become noticeable during atmospheric reentry of spacecraft at an altitude of around 120 km (75 mi). Several layers can be distinguished in the atmosphere, based on characteristics such as temperature and composition. The study of Earth's atmosphere and its processes is called atmospheric science (aerology). Early pioneers in the field include Léon Teisserenc de Bort and Richard Assmann.[3]

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